EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY

2008‐‐2010 Biennial Review

Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies

GENERAL POLICIES 

  

Eastern Oregon University’s policies on drug and alcohol abuse have proven to be workable and 

effective. The policies are the same for all members of the campus community. In addition, the 

University subscribes to the “Principles of an Institution ‐ wide policy ‐ on Drug Use and Alcohol Abuse 

for Oregon Higher

 Education” which was developed by the Oregon Business Council and higher 

education leaders in the State.  

A committee representing faculty, staff, students and local law enforcement developed the 

University’s policies. To date, no challenges have been made about the wording or intent of any of these 

policies. There is no 

doubt that the University will penalize persons who fail to abide with these policies. 

An excellent working relationship exists between the University administrative leadership and the local 

police in regard to law enforcement.  

In the course of each year the University sponsors information sessions about the consequences 

of drug and alcohol

 abuse. The University’s counseling and Health center staffs are available to provide 

information, treatment and/or referral to students who wish to resolve personal difficulties associated 

with drugs and alcohol abuse. Consultation is available to faculty and staff. The Counseling Center and 

Student Health Center also work closely with community agencies 

that provide treatment alternatives; 

namely, The Center for Human Development, Alcoholics Anonymous and the Grande Ronde Hospital. 

Faculty/Staff are referred to outside agencies including law enforcement, health centers, clinics and/or 

independent practitioners for help with issues regarding alcohol and/or drug abuse. As a public entity, 

the University exercises its responsibilities with

 the enforcement of laws about use, possession and 

distribution of drugs and/or alcohol.  

A University Wellness Committee was formed to enhance the effort to inform students and the 

campus about alcohol and other drug use and abuse. There is an ongoing effort to help students make 

informed choices that will 

lead to healthy lifestyles.  

 

PUBLICATION OF POLICIES 

  

The University publishes “Drug and Alcohol Policies, Laws, Available Treatment, Health Risks” 

each academic term in its Schedule of Classes

. Students tend to keep the Schedule throughout the term, 

thus increasing their exposure to, and awareness of, EOU policies concerning drugs and alcohol. The 

materials in the class schedule dealing with Drugs and Alcohol are also printed in the Student Handbook 

(see EOU web page) as well as posted in the residence halls. In addition, the University publishes its 

Drug and Alcohol Policy in the Faculty/Staff Handbook 

(see EOU web page). New faculty and staff 

orientation programs include information on accessing EOU alcohol and drug policies and procedures 

for University employees.  

 

IMPLEMENTATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF POLICIES 

  

In 1994 the University began to publicize the fact that the majority of students do not abuse 

alcohol, use drugs, or accept behavior by persons under the influence of intoxicants. This emphasis on 

positive peer values has, we believe, reduced incidents of alcohol and drug abuse. Appropriate conduct 

is celebrated;

 inappropriate conduct is subject to discipline. The Counseling Center first administered 

the Alcohol/Drug Use Survey to students in 1990 and in the following years: 1995, 1997, and 2000 

(available on file). In the year 2002 we switched to the CORE Survey administering it once every two 

years (available on file). 

This nationally standardized drug and alcohol survey enables us to compare our 

statistics with other colleges and universities of like sizes in addition to specific statistics to our campus. 

The results of previous surveys show a steady slight increase in the consumption and/or abuse of drugs 

and alcohol on campus. This year data showed a decrease in most areas, even though we had a larger 

sample size than the last biennial review. We had about a 2.5% drop in alcohol

 consumption reported 

both in the past year and in the past 30 days from the survey administration. In addition, binge drinking 

appeared to drop about 3%. In general, we are 10% below the identified reference group (58,392 college 

students). Of concern is a drop of 4% awareness of a campus 

drug prevention program for this report 

(2008: 25% vs. 2010: 21%). We had about an 8% decrease in students being aware that the university 

has an alcohol and drug prevention policy. Alcohol appears to have decreased in prominence but still 

appears to be the drug of choice. Problematic experiences with legal

 dilemmas due to drugs and alcohol 

have decreased and students reported suicidal thinking and behavior, being hurt or injured, and 

unwanted sexual experiences as decreasing by about 1% dropping below national norm. Sample size this 

year was 201 students. Sample size for 2008 was 182.  

A review of disciplinary data 

maintained by the University, as well as the results of the CORE 

survey, indicate that alcohol is the “drug of choice” at Eastern. The 2010 CORE survey supports these 

conclusions. There have been few drug abuse incidents, but those that are reported have resulted in 

disciplinary action by the University, as

 well as being arrested by local law enforcement officials as 

appropriate. Marijuana use increased 4% from the last biennial review.  

The 2010 CORE survey was done this year utilizing Survey Monkey, a web‐based survey tool. It 

was administered in the spring of 2010 to the on‐campus student community. 

Executive reports from 

CORE for 2010 are included in this report.  

Policies appear to be consistently enforced and penalties are administered in a fair and 

equitable manner. The University’s unambiguous posture about drug and alcohol abuse is: it is 

unhealthy, risky and will not be tolerated. Since 1993, all campus buildings

 are designated as “tobacco 

free.” Since 1994, student athletes are prohibited from using all forms of tobacco during competitions 

and practices. Tobacco cessation education programs have been regularly offered to the campus 

 

EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

  

Eastern continues to offer diversified educational programs about drug and alcohol abuse. New 

Student Orientation includes information about substance abuse, campus services that assist people 

experiencing substance problems and relevant campus policies in regard to drugs and alcohol. The 

campus community emphasizes that having fun at Eastern does not require 

use of drugs or alcohol, and 

that there are serious consequences from substance abuse. Again, positive peer values are reinforced 

throughout the orientation program. In 2009‐10, the Health and Wellness Committee was charged with 

educational programming for the campus regarding various wellness issues including drugs and alcohol.  

Residence Life conducts

 an on‐going drug and alcohol education program. This included sessions 

led by Counseling Center and Student Health Center staff, bulletin board displays, showing of movies 

with themes about drugs and alcohol abuse, and guest speakers. The Residence Life staff also sponsored 

the annual Alcohol Awareness Week activities. The Health 

and Wellness Committee was responsible in 

2009 and 2010 for the Alcohol Awareness Week activities.  

This past biennium 2009‐2010, we utilized 3rd Millennium Classrooms: Under the influence: E 

Checkup (formerly ECHUG) and Marijuana 101 (formerly ETOKE) evaluations. These are online 

educational programs for students struggling with alcohol and/or drug issues.

 After completing 

evaluation, they bring results to the Counseling Center to review them and evaluate services if needed. 

We saw 51 students in this capacity in the last two years.  

The University’s Counseling Center is very active in alcohol and drug education. The Counseling 

Center staff activities include:  

  • Individual 

counseling sessions. (including E Checkup and Marijuana 101 Evaluations)  

  • Referral of individuals to appropriate treatment agencies.  
  • Consultation with Residence Life staff.  
  • Freshmen Orientation workshops dealing with sex, alcohol and drugs.  
  • Healthy relationship seminars.  
  • Dissemination of Students in Distress pamphlet for faculty and staff.  
  • Freshmen Orientation workshop on the Red Zone  
  • Articles in the

 campus newspaper regarding alcohol and substance abuse.  

  • Continued implementation of E Checkup and Marijuana 101 evaluations for MIP referred   

 The University Student Health Center also is engaged in drug and alcohol education programs. 

Health Center Staff writes periodic articles in the campus newspaper about drug and alcohol 

 

FUTURE AND ONGOING ACTIVITIES 

  

Eastern has a commitment to educating and helping students develop healthy lifestyles and 

make appropriate choices for themselves. The Counseling Center, Residence Life, Health Center, Athletic 

Department, and Office of Student Affairs all continue to develop strategies and programs to facilitate 

awareness and education regarding drug and alcohol abuse.  

The

 University’s athletic department continues to be active in education and prevention. They 

work closely with the Counseling Center, and refer students they believe to be struggling with drug 

and/or alcohol problems. Special emphasis has been given to intervention strategies for students both in 

the classroom and on the field/court.  

The 

Health and Wellness Committee works to help develop and implement alternative activities 

to enhance healthy lifestyles and choices. It consists of representatives from the Counseling Center, 

Student Health Center, Student Involvement, Residence Life, Athletic Departments, and student 

representatives. During the 2009‐2010 year they developed programs and workshops around alcohol 

and drug awareness. E Checkup and Marijuana 101 evaluations continue for the purpose of educating 

Minors in Possession (MIP). We believe that the Health and Wellness Committee has a positive effect on 

lowering alcohol consumption on our campus. This combined with the millennial generation who are 

more compliant, group oriented and health conscious could explain our positive decrease in abuse.  

It is clear that both students and employees are made aware of the risks involved in alcohol and 

drug abuse. Included in their orientation and throughout their matriculation they are given access to a 

variety of available programs. They are given a

 clear message regarding both legal and ethical 

responsibilities the University has to enforce and uphold.  

The University takes a strong stand in regard to alcohol and drug abuse, however the campus 

also believes in education and support for those seeking to change their behavior.  

Contributors to this report were the 

Health and Wellness Committee, Director of Housing and 

Student Involvement, the Director of Counseling Center, Counseling Center Staff, Director of Health 

Center, Student Health Center Staff, and the Director and staff of the Athletic Department.

نظرات کاربران 0 نظر